Setting up your gas refrigerator

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setting-up-propane-fridge

After you bring your new gas refrigerator home, it is time for the install. In order to ensure a safe and proper installation in your home, it is highly recommended that you hire a trained professional. If you decide to do the install yourself, Warehouse Appliance wants to make sure you get your new fridge up and running properly while staying safe.

Before you begin, it is important to note that any gas fumes should be dealt with quickly. If you smell gas, open all of the windows and doors in your home, do not turn any electrical switches off or on, and put out any open flames immediately. Call your gas provider right away.

Connect Gas Line
Before connecting the gas line, ensure you have enough flex line to move the fridge away from the wall. This will allow enough room in the event your fridge needs servicing and for cleaning. It is good practice to connect the flex line to an on/off valve.

Test for Leaks
You must test all connections for gas leaks before you ignite the gas unit. You can use a soapy water method or professional solutions such as a “Gas Leak Detector” to test the connection. This is accomplished by putting on the soapy or professional solution and looking for bubbles. Once you have ignited the unit, you should do a secondary test to ensure there are no leaks.

Check Gas Pressure
The design specifications for all EZ Freeze propane refrigerators state the proper pressure that the fridge operates on. The pressure can be checked by your gas supplier during installation. You can also use a manometer to check the pressure yourself.

Level
Because this type of gas refrigerator requires gravity to operate properly, it is important that the fridge remains level. If the refrigerator is not level, it may not run at peak efficiency.

Ventilate
It is important to position the refrigerator so there is enough space for heat to properly ventilate behind and above the unit. Without proper ventilation, the fridge could produce a heat buildup negatively affecting performance, or it may create a draft which could blow out the burner.

When properly installed, your gas refrigerator will run reliably and efficiently. If you would like a skilled technician to install your new fridge or if you experience any issues during setup, call Warehouse Appliance at 928-636-1955.

For additional set-up information, please see our article tilted “How to set up your new gas refrigerator for proper operation

How to set up your new gas refrigerator for proper operation

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Setting propane/gas pressure

It is very important that the gas pressure be set correctly. Too high or too low of gas pressure may lead to poor performance or permanent damage to your gas refrigerator. Proper gas pressure for a LPG propane system is 11 inches of water column. Your gas supplier will test and set the correct pressure for you. It is possible to do it yourself. Check out our “How to test gas pressure” page.

Burping the Propane Gas Refrigerator or Natural Gas Refrigerator
If your new Diamond gas refrigeratorsEZ Freeze gas refrigerators, or most other gas refrigerators, has been laid down during shipping or the unit is not cooling correctly within the first day or two of operation, it is possible that the unit may need to be burped. This process releases an air lock and allows the chemicals to return to the proper levels within the ammonia absorption unit. The process varies depending on the brand of gas refrigerator you own. For most models, turn the unit off and let the unit cool. Disconnect the gas supply line. Carefully rotate the unit upside down so it stands on it’s top. Rotate the gas refrigerator from side to side not front to back. Let the unit sit in this position for 15 minutes. Rotate back to it’s upright position standing on the legs. Let the unit sit in this position for another 15 minutes before lighting. Reconnect the gas supply and test for leaks.

Burping for Danby / Consul propane refrigerator models, turn the unit off and let the unit cool. Disconnect the gas supply line. Carefully rotate the unit counter clockwise to it’s left side. Let the unit sit in this position for 15 to 20 minutes. Rotate the unit counter clockwise upside down so it stands on it’s top. Let the unit sit in this position for 15 to 20 minutes. Rotate the unit counter clockwise to it’s right side. Let the unit sit in this position for 15 to 20 minutes. Rotate counter clockwise back to it’s upright position standing on the legs.

Tips for operating your Gas Refrigerator or Gas Freezer
Once the gas fridge / freezer is operating, let it chill down for approximately 12 hours before loading with food. You will notice the freezer will chill first. When the freezer portion is significantly chilled down, then the fridge section will start to get cold. This is the nature of the gravity operation built into the system. The refrigerator section is the first to be effected by any change to the thermostat, ambient air temperature, humidity, or change of door opening cycles. Load warm or room temperature foods in smaller portions a couple hours apart. Let the unit stabilize for a few days prior to making adjustments to the thermostat. Check the refrigerator compartment temperature first thing in the morning to get an accurate reading of the thermostat setting. We suggest to use an external thermometer to monitor the temperatures. Do not overload the unit with room temperature liquids such as large jugs of water. Load the freezer with Ice trays or objects to be frozen prior to bed time. This way the unit will have all night to recover. Aluminum Ice Cube Trays make ice much faster than plastic trays.

Be sure the gas fridge is level in both directions since the absorption system works from gravity, it is vital to the proper flow rate that the unit is level.

Be sure the gas refrigerator has proper ventilation an all sides. Most manufacturers will have recommendations within the owners manual. Minimums are usually 2″ left and right sides and 8″ above with 2″ at rear. Intake and exhaust ventilation is also recommended. Always turn the gas valve on slowly to protect the regulator and/or thermostat from a surge of pressure. Test for leaks with a solution of soapy water and brush around all gas connections before lighting the gas refrigerator.

If you still have questions about the set up of your propane refrigerator, please call one of our technicians at 928-636-1955 or contact us.

Full-time use of a gas refrigerator in your home

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Full-time use of a gas refrigerator in the homeWhile many propane refrigerators have been used in RVs, cabins and vacation homes, there is a growing number of households that have made a complete transition from electric to gas refrigerators. Warehouse Appliance discusses full-time use of gas refrigerators in your home.

The initial startup up rules are basically the same for the full-time gas refrigerator user as they are for those who supplement with gas:

  • Don’t fill up the fridge with any food or liquids that are not already cold or frozen.
  • Keep the door of the fridge closed as much of the time as possible.
  • Set the temperature setting to the maximum.

Make sure you adhere to the above rules when you bring groceries home from your regular shopping trips. It is always best to load the food goods in smaller amounts. Try to do this at timed intervals. Ambient temperature food should be loaded at no more than 10 pounds every 2 hours. Also, make sure to stabilize your temperature and thermostat setting. Keep your eye on the refrigerator interior temperatures. In a gas refrigerator, the thermostat setting will mostly affect the refrigerator compartment temperatures. The freezer will not have a thermostat.

Temperature setting is accomplished by the thermostat that is at the very bottom on the outside front near or behind the kick plate. The control panel is labeled with numbers that are merely a reference and do not correspond with the actual temperature.

Whether you go with a gas refrigerator part-time or full-time, Warehouse Appliance is here to help and answer any of your questions. If you’re thinking about purchasing a propane refrigerator or have questions about the one you already own, call the gas appliance experts at Warehouse Appliance today at 928-636-1955.

Why you need a propane refrigerator

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Warehouse Appliance is the leader in propane refrigerators and has the best warranty in the business.Who knows why you need a propane refrigerator better than the leader in propane refrigerators? As the industry leader, Warehouse Appliance, can help you select the right propane fridge for your cabin, vacation home, RV or hunting camp.

Reasons to own a gas fridge

  • Gas refrigerators are quiet – Since gas refrigerators don’t have a compressor they are completely quiet.
  • You live off grid – With no conventional means of energy to power an electric refrigerator, you’re limited to where you can live, but a gas refrigerator doesn’t confine your choices. Unlike electricity, no matter where you are, you can transport and easily store the fuel necessary for operating a gas fridge.
  • Your location is prone to power outages – For some of us, every year brings tornadoes, hurricanes, fires and floods. Even in the city, homeowners experience power outages – but it won’t matter if you have a propane refrigerator. Gas refrigerators keep on running, keeping your food items cold and safe. If you’ve suffered extended power outages, you know that replacing a refrigerator full of spoiled food is expensive.
  • Gas refrigerators are efficient – Not only do they run colder than a conventional fridge, but they have far fewer running parts than a compressor system. Fewer parts mean fewer failures. In fact, there are virtually no moving parts in a propane gas refrigeration system.

Considering all these reasons, anyone can see that choosing a gas fridge is a smart choice. No matter where you live, whether in the heart of the city, off the grid, or on the road, Warehouse Appliance can help you select the right size fridge to meet your family’s needs. For more information call Warehouse Appliance today at 928-636-1955.

Using propane in your home

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Propane for appliances in your homeDid you know that there is an efficient, safe, and reliable alternative to electricityfor many appliances? Warehouse Appliance would like to tell you about using propane in your home.

Because of its safety, efficiency, and dependability, many people are using propane to go off the grid. Others use propane to supplement the electricity in their home. Propane is also a very affordable solution that’s ideal for families who want to minimize their carbon footprint and go a little greener.

There are many benefits you will receive by using propane in your home. Here are several:

  • You will save money. Heating your water with propane rather than electricity will save you approximately 30 percent of your water heating costs per year. A propane clothes dryer will save you about 50 percent compared with the use of an electric dryer. You’ll save plenty by using a gas refrigerator, too.
  • Propane is safe. Propane tanks are 20 times more puncture resistant than those used for gasoline, ethanol, and methanol. Home propane tanks are often buried. If you do experience a propane leak, the added odorant (similar to the smell of rotten eggs) will help you detect it so you can get it repaired.
  • Versatility. When people think of propane, outdoor grills often come to mind. but propane fuels many household appliances: home heating or your boiler, your fireplace, clothes dryer, range, refrigerator and your oven can all run on propane. If your home is equipped to use propane, you have a wide range of choices available.
  • Propane is environmentally safe. Propane is listed as a clean fuel in the 1990 Clean Air Act and the Energy Policy Act of 1992. In fact, propane burns cleaner than any other fossil fuel.

Warehouse Appliance would be happy to answer any questions you may have about gas refrigerators and propane appliances. We are here to help you as you consider the advantages of using propane in your home. Call the gas appliance experts at Warehouse Appliance today at 928-636-1955.

Why people choose propane refrigerators

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Warehouse Appliance can help you choose the right propane refrigerator for your home or cabin.Have you heard of propane refrigerators but don’t really understand why people choose them? Warehouse Appliance, the leader in propane refrigerators, can help you understand why and how to select a propane refrigerator that is perfect for remote cabins, vacation homes, hunting camps, or your RV.

Here are some of the reasons people choose propane refrigerators.

  • You live off the grid.
  • You don’t like the noise an electric refrigerator makes.
  • You have considered the efficiency of a gas fridge.
  • Your home is subject to natural disasters and power outages.

One of the most basic necessities in life is food. The need for food storage is practical, and how food is stored affects your health. Cold food storage when done properly is important for healthy living. Consider all these reasons and you will see why a gas fridge is right for you.

All refrigerators must run from an energy source. One of the gas fridge advantages is how easy it is to store propane and unlike electricity, it can be transported. While most homeowners run the risk of losing electricity during a thunderstorm, the propane refrigerator will continue running, keeping your perishables fresh.

One power outage of more than two days can completely decimate your food supply in your electric fridge. With the cost of food within the fridge being upwards of $500, it pays to have a gas fridge as a backup unit.

The myth that a gas refrigerator does not cool as well as an electric is not true. Not only will they run colder than an electric unit, the absorption unit has far fewer parts than an electric compressor system. Fewer parts mean less chance of a failure. Other than the thermostat, there are virtually no moving parts within the propane gas refrigeration system.

Warehouse Appliance has the largest inventory of gas refrigerators in the U.S., and we can help you find the right gas fridge for you. We would be happy to answer any questions you may have about gas refrigerators and propane appliances. We are here to help you as you consider the advantages of using propane in your home. Call the gas appliance experts at Warehouse Appliance today at 928-636-1955.

Now is a good time to switch to a propane refrigerator

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switch to propane fridgeIs there a good time to switch to a propane refrigerator? Warehouse Appliance thinks so. If you’re an eager outdoor enthusiast, you probably already know how unimaginably liberating propane appliances are. Propane appliances afford their owners the freedom and pleasure to enjoy hot meals, hot water, cold food safely stored, lighting and more no matter where they are because propane appliances don’t suffer from the failures of appliances dependent on electricity.

There has been an increasing interest in switching out traditional electrical appliances for the incomparable dependability and security of propane appliances. With propane, the property owner stores propane in a tank, or tanks, which can vary in size and may require refilling every year or several times a year depending on the climate, where you live, the number of people occupying the house and how many appliances are using propane. And propane users can also shop for the best rates which traditional utility users usually cannot do.

Q: So when is the best time to switch out your old appliances for dependable, affordable propane appliances?

A: As soon as your situation allows you to swap them out because the price of freedom is more than worth it. When you consider the cost of dependence on undependable conventional sources of power and the cost to replace food after a power outage, or the inability to have hot water or lighting and the very limited availability of electricity in remote areas, you can easily see the benefits of switching.

Whenever you are ready to upgrade to a gas refrigerator, or any other propane appliance, Warehouse Appliance can answer your questions and help you select the right appliances for your needs. Call Warehouse Appliance today at 928-636-1955.

Absorption refrigeration

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absorption refrigeration diagramAt Warehouse Appliance, we have spent years educating homeowners on the benefits of gas refrigerators, but how do they work? They work on the principle of absorption refrigeration, but first, we need to define what absorption refrigeration means.

Simply put, absorption refrigeration “absorbs” the heat inside the fridge.
Removing the heat makes the air inside the fridge cold. The absorption unit or “Cooling Unit” is located in the back of the fridge in a sealed box which contains an array of steel pipes.

Both propane and natural gas are commonly used in absorption refrigerators.
The gas is used to heat the absorption unit. The heat produced by the gas, which is located at the bottom of the unit, activates a chemical mixture inside the cooling unit. When hot, this mixture changes from a liquid into a vapor and begins moving to the top of the unit in the same way coffee is made in a percolator.

Once at the top of the unit, the chemical mixture – which is now ammonia vapor – condenses into liquid ammonia. Now in the liquid state, the ammonia begins pouring down the steel pipes. The pipes, which are in a zig-zag pattern, go through the freezer compart where the liquid ammonia begins absorbing the heat.

Because it is at the top of the refrigerator, the liquid ammonia absorbs the heat in the freezer compartment first and continues flowing down to the fridge. If the ammonia has not reached its maximum absorption in the freezer it will continue to absorb heat from the refrigerator as it moves down the pipes. This process is the reason the freezer cools down before the lower part of the refrigerator.

Now you know the basics of absorption refrigeration. If you have questions about gas refrigerators or freezers for your home or cabin, call Warehouse Appliance at 928-636-1955.

Facts about propane gas

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What is propane gas, and why is it a good energy source for refrigerators? Warehouse Appliance, with the largest inventory of gas refrigerators in the U.S., shares some thoughts on propane gas.

What is propane gas?

Propane gas is sometimes known as liquefied petroleum gas, or LPG. This is a gas normally compressed and stored as a liquid. Propane is nontoxic, colorless, and almost odorless. There is a well-known identifying odor that is added to propane so it can be detected in case of a leak. Propane is commonly used for home heating, cooking, water heating, and as a fuel for heavy industrial and agricultural machinery. When used as vehicle fuel, propane is known as propane autogas. Propane is an especially effective source for refrigeration.

Is propane gas readily available?

Although primarily a byproduct of domestic natural gas processing, propane is also produced from crude oil refinement. Propane supplies in the United States are becoming more and more abundant. This is largely because of increased supplies of natural gas.

The United States produces more than enough propane to meet the demand. In fact, the U.S. is the world’s largest exporter of LP gas as well as the largest producer. As a clean-burning alternative to gasoline and diesel fuel, propane is increasing in popularity because it is so affordable! Domestic propane production is expected to continue to grow rapidly, keeping propane prices low relative to oil prices.

Warehouse Appliance hopes this discussion of the nature of propane gas has been informative. We have been educating people for years on the benefits of using a propane gas refrigerator. If you have any questions about gas refrigerators or freezers for your home or cabin, call Warehouse Appliance at 928-636-1955.

Adjusting the Temperature of Propane Gas Refrigerators

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How to adjust the temperature

Over the years we have sold thousands of Propane Gas Refrigerators and almost all of them have ended up in a remote location for use in a home or cabin that does not have electricity. Off-Grid owners seem to be more interested in adjusting their gas refrigerators to the proper temperatures than compared to owners of common electric refrigerators. The reasons for this can be;

Propane is usually trucked to the location or hand carried so it is safe to say that conserving of the gas usage is valued.

Most rural off grid homes, cabins, and cottages don’t have automatic climate control. This means the off grid refrigerator is subject to a wider range of ambient temperatures during the day as well as the seasonal changes.

Gas refrigerators are all manual temperature controlled. No digital thermostats or electronics whatsoever. This is what you would expect from a non-electric refrigerator.

For those seeking an education on setting the temperature, I’m going to split it up into two parts. Part Time Living and Full Time Living.

Part Time Living with a Propane Gas Refrigerator –
Since a fair number of our customers use the fridges at a weekend getaway or during a short vacation, they will typically turn the unit on upon arrival and shut it down when they leave. The largest propane refrigerator in the world made by EZ Freeze measures out to be 21 cubic feet. Chill down time for one of these units if it is empty will be 10 to 12 hours in 70 to 80 degree ambient air temperature. There are a few do’s and don’ts during this chill down time that is critical to operation during the next few days.

  • Do keep the door closed as much as possible.
  • Don’t load the fridge with any food or liquids that are not cold or frozen.
  • Do set the temperature setting to Maximum.

These are all common sense but you would be surprised at how many people overlook these rules. Especially rule #1. Guests and children that don’t understand absorption refrigeration will open the door to look inside by habit. It’s important to educate them.

After the chill down time is over, it is good practice to load the food goods in smaller amounts at timed intervals. Rule of thumb for ambient temperature food is 10 pounds every 2 hours. Loading frozen goods or cold foods will not have any adverse effects, so it’s OK to load your entire cache at this time. As for the ambient temp foods, if you load a high volume at one time, it is likely that the fridge will take 3 times longer to recover to safe food keeping temperatures than if you load only 10 pounds at a time over a longer period. Loading large amounts of ambient temperature liquids is also bad practice. Liquid is the most dense food and will take the most energy to cool. One way to cheat the process is to use smaller containers of liquids therefore increasing the air contact surface area. This helps greatly to get the drinks cold. 4 Quarts of water will chill or freeze faster than 1 gallon.

My advice to weekenders is to keep the thermostat set to maximum and replenish the ice trays or drinks at night right before bedtime. In some cases where a large party of guests are on hand, we suggest to not use the fridge for drinks. Using the fridge for drinks puts a huge strain on any type of fridge, gas (absorption) or electric (compressor). Using an ice chest for drinks keeps the fridge door closed more often and cuts down on the kitchen traffic too. Chefs love this idea.

Full Time Living with a Propane Gas Refrigerator –
For our “Full Timer” customers, your initial startup up rules are basically the same as the “Part Timer” rules. And you can also use these rules when you bring groceries home from the weekly shopping trip. 10 pounds every 2 hours still applies here. Beyond that, it is important to stabilize your temperature and thermostat setting. The most important area to monitor is the refrigerator interior temperatures. Due to the nature of how a gas refrigerator works, the thermostat setting will primarily affect the refrigerator compartment temperatures. There is no thermostat for the freezer. All the temperature setting is done by one thermostat located at the very bottom of the cabinet on the outside front near or behind the kick plate. This is true for all brands of gas powered home type refrigerators made by EZ Freeze, Diamond, Miller Refrigeration, Crystal Cold, Dometic, Sevel, Consul, Danby, and Unique. The control panel will be labeled with numbers that do not correspond with temperature. The numbers are simply a reference.

It is my belief that the best tool you can own when living full time with a gas fridge is a Remote Digital Thermometer. It allows the user to monitor the inside temperatures without opening the door. If an adjustment to the thermostat is needed, It will alert you either by the alarm or by what the display reads. In the case of the fridge stops working from a lack of gas supply, it may save you hundreds of dollars in groceries.

Stabilizing the temperature is fairly simple. It just takes a little time. Starting at the maximum setting as described in the initial startup, monitor the temperatures of the fridge compartment taking the “true” reading first thing in the morning before the door is opened. When this reading reaches freezing at 32 degrees, start to slightly move the dial toward the minimum setting by approximately 1/12 of a turn. Do this every morning until the temperature reaches your target. My target is usually 34 to 38 degrees.

Slight adjustments from this point can be made to compensate for seasonal changes and usage variations. We like to prejudge the high usage times and lower the temperatures in advance to get a head start on the recovery times. For instance, if you are planning a party or family get together, turn the thermostat toward maximum the night prior to the event.

Seasonal changes will usually demand an adjustment. Not only for temperature, but humidity levels will affect the settings more dramatically. High humidity will also produce more frost on the cooling fins and can reduce efficiency. Defrosting is another area of maintenance that can help with temperature stabilization.
One last note, a full refrigerator of cold food will be more temperature stable during the day than one with less food. It is due to the mass of food versus the mass of air. The food mass will retain the cold whereas the air mass will fall out when the door is opened.